Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

THE MYSTERIOUS FLIGHT

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

The vintage biplane landed on frosty farmland in the village of Kallosemjen, about 70 km from the Hungary-Ukraine border, and was found without crew and passengers. Using thermal-imaging equipment and sniffer dogs, police soon discovered eight Vietnamese and three Afghans who had been on-board. Police started to chase the pilot of the Ukrainian registered AN-2 straight away, but traces were lost. The whereabouts of whoever flew the plane is still a mystery, however, as is where it began its journey and the route it took.

The daring bid to enter the EU from the skies was foiled by an off-duty policeman who heard the aeroplane, dubbed a ‘tank or tractor with wings’ because of its appearance, passes above his house on Monday and raised the alarm. Officers rushed to the scene and found the plane, which had set off from neighbouring Ukraine, abandoned in a snow-topped field in the dead of night. A human smuggling probe has been launched for the passengers of the ageing plane.

Ukrainian officials said the plane is registered to an owner in Avdiivka, a war-scarred industrial city on the frontline of fighting between government forces and Russian-led separatists, some 1,400 km east of the Hungarian frontier.

The old school designed plane entered service in 1947 and is valued for its strength and versatility. This is believed to be the first time such a plane has been used to smuggle migrants into Hungary. The light aircraft is a Soviet mass-produced single-engine biplane utility and agricultural aircraft designed and manufactured by the Antonov Design Bureau beginning in 1946. Its remarkable durability, high lifting power, and ability to take off and land from poor runways have given it long service life. The AN-2 was produced till 2001 and remains still in service with military and civilian operators around the world. 

Credit by MTVA

After the incident, the aircraft was partly dismantled on-site and transported to further investigation. The truncated fuselage with its tail fin and wings left separated behind, can currently be seen on a remote parking stand at Nyíregyháza Airport as a sad messenger of what happened.

Known for its dependability, the AN-2 was used by North Korea during the Korean War and by North Vietnamese forces during the Vietnam War as a Navy interceptor. Croatian forces also used the planes during the Croatian War of Independence. North Korea still has about 300 of the planes and in recent years has used them during for commando drills amid heightened tensions with South Korea and the US.

MYSTERIOUS REJTÉLYES
BIPLANE KÉTFEDELŰ REPÜLŐGÉP
SNIFFER DOG KERESŐKUTYA
CHASE ÜLDÖZ
TRACE NYOM
DARING BID MERÉSZ KÍSÉRLET
FOIL MEGAKADÁLYOZ
ABANDONED ELHAGYATOTT
HUMAN SMUGGLING PROBE EMBERCSEMPÉSZETI NYOMOZÁS
REGISTERED LAJSTROMBA VÉVE
WAR-SCARRED HÁBORÚ SÚJTOTTA
FRONTIER HATÁR
OLD SCHOOL RÉGIMÓDI
VERSATILITY SOKOLDALÚSÁG
UTILITY TÖBBCÉLÚ
LIFTING POWER EMELŐERŐ
DISMANTLE SZÉTSZEREL
TRUNCATED MEGCSONKÍTOTT
FUSELAGE REPÜLŐGÉPTÖRZS
TAIL FIN FÜGGŐLEGES VEZÉRSÍK
DEPENDABILITY MEGBÍZHATÓSÁG
INTERCEPTOR ELFOGÓ
COMMANDO DRILL KOMMANDÓS GYAKORLAT
HEIGHTENED TENSION FOKOZOTT FESZÜLTSÉG

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

CONTACTLESS SECURITY

Nehézségi fok: NEHÉZ

As the world begins to move through the shadows of the pandemic and air transport begins to recover, it is clear that aviation will play a vital role in accelerating the economy and bringing a return to a feeling of well-being. Governments and airport operators need to rebuild the passenger’s confidence in flying again amid the COVID-19 crisis.

Just as aviation security changed in the aftermath of the 9-11 event, this crisis could lead to a paradigm shift that helps to create a safer and more secure environment. It is imperative that passengers, staff and other stakeholders have continued assurance and confidence in airports, amid and well after the pandemic. Like enhanced hygiene standards and social distancing, the measures executed in airports to fight against virus transmission will be part of the new normal until effective therapies and/or a vaccine becomes available.

Whilst much attention is directed towards health and safety, aviation security can never be compromised. Crime and terrorism did not go away. Given that social distancing is the new normal and COVID-19 is changing the interactions between people, the appropriate technologies might be in place to help airports to improve security effectiveness, enhance operational efficiencies and boost passenger confidence for air travel.

Technology has always been a key part of the security implementation for airports. Innovation in passenger and baggage screening technologies, such as the millimetre-wave body scanner, checkpoint CT scanner, automatic screening lane, centralised image processing and artificial intelligence, has been proven in practical use as components of ACI’s World-led Smart Security Program.

Recently, passenger traffic, as a result of the impact of COVID-19 around the world, has plummeted. It provided the aviation community, including civil aviation authorities, airports, airlines and relevant security suppliers, an opportunity to explore the potential of these new technologies to make security checkpoint contactless and flexible, ready for passenger numbers pick-up in different stages of recovery, whilst effectively addressing passenger concerns on safety and aviation security.

There is a concern that passengers often wait in line in the baggage preparation area of checkpoint, while they pull items, including liquids, electronics, and powders out of their cabin baggage to put them into trays so they can go through X-ray systems separately. This increases the time spent at checkpoints and leads to a bottleneck of throughput, posing a challenge to keep social distancing properly. It also increases the amounts of trays used in security screening, which could increase the risk of cross infections between passengers and staff if the tray is contaminated.

The newest CT cabin baggage screening technology with its powerful detection and material discrimination of explosives, weapons and other contrabands, it can allow passengers to leave liquids and electronics in cabin baggage when they pass through security checkpoints. It also cuts down the time of preparation and the amounts of trays used enormously, mitigating the risk of tactile transmission of contagious disease.

When paired with an automatic screening lane, multiple paralleled stations could allow several passengers to divest themselves of their belongings at the same time, whilst observing social distancing for both passengers and staff in the lane.

Furthermore, with the more accurate image interpretation with a 3D view and high-quality images, lower false alarms and speedier conveyor belt, CT technology offers added benefits: it allows airport operators to enable passengers to go through the security checkpoint at a steady pace and avoid any congestion. Deployment of such CT scanners would be a significant step for a short-term response to COVID-19 and long-term interest in improvements for passengers and bags processing in a checkpoint.

In addition to the safety and health protection of passengers and staff, it is important to reduce their face-to-face interactions and the frequency of physical bag searching in secondary inspection.

In a typical passenger screening checkpoint, passengers go through the metal detector and then a pat-down search when they cannot detect non-metal weapons, particularly with the sophisticated concealments by terrorists. A growing number of airports around the world began adopting new passenger screening technologies such as millimetre-wave body scanners to replace metal detectors as a primary screening method. It can detect metal and non-metal items hidden beneath passenger’s clothing and mark any suspicious area on a generic sketch allowing security staff to perform targeted searches and allows for passengers to divest themselves under the close watch in special circumstances.

With the limited detection of dual-view X-ray systems at a checkpoint, frequently-occurred alarms, triggered by overlapped and cluttered contents in a bag, have to be resolved manually for clear confirmation.

A Smart Security Program, with its central image processing (CIP) which is enabled by multiplexing technology, allows security personnel at airports to carry out a direct bag search at a secondary search station. Another display screen shows security staff the image analysis results and suspicious areas highlighted with colour frames for a targeted search.

Before the pandemic, many airports employed central image processing to improve security and efficiency. It allows security staff to be located in a remote and quiet place away from the hustle and bustle of checkpoints, helping the operators to focus better and deliver quicker and more accurate image analysis. During the pandemic, CIP also provides the extra benefits to ensure the social distancing properly observed between passengers and staff. Even if disposable rubber gloves are used, the risk is still present.

CIP can also offer airports flexibility and adaptability in optimizing human resources, which is crucial to mitigating the risk of operational interruption. By its nature, the scanned images generated in any lane can be collected and distributed evenly to the next available image operator. That is to say, and one officer can serve multiple lanes with high productivity, ensuring operators to have the flexibility to open and close a lane depending on passenger traffic and flight schedules.

Technology advancements and increasing connectivity in security checkpoint provide airport operators with an intriguing opportunity to apply artificial intelligence (AI) to make security screening more secure, contactless and safer.

With the introduction of AI as an extra pair of eyes, passengers and their belongings can be screened more quickly and accurately, and to a large extent, it reduces the need to physically touch or search.

As more data is fed into AI technology, AI algorithms would be able to clear most passengers and bags automatically, allowing security staff to focus on the scanned images with alarms only. This could make the entire process smoother for most passengers. Against the backdrop of the pandemic, the need for contactless screening may accelerate the developments of AI technologies.

Looking into the future, with the roll-out of biometric-based identity verification technology in airports, AI algorithms can be harnessed by airport operators to efficiently analyze large amounts of data, including tickets, scanned images, identity verification, etc., ensuring more efficient, effective and accurate passenger risk assessments.

Given that the majority of passengers pose no risk to aviation security, AI can be effective in enabling a risk-based security system, optimizing the security screening resources commensurate with passengers’ risk assessments. It would provide operators with the ability to shift more attention to the high-risk passengers, or those with little or no information available.

By bringing together the millimetre-wave body scanner, checkpoint CT scanner, automatic screening lane, centralized image processing and AI technology into a comprehensive and integrated checkpoint, we will move towards the future vision of a contactless security checkpoint. It would support the restart and recovery of global air travel safely and securely by minimizing the health risk to passengers and staff while strengthening confidence among the passengers.
unitingaviation.com

CONTACTLESS ÉRINTÉS NÉLKÜLI
PANDEMIC VILÁGJÁRVÁNY
ACCELERATE GYORSÍT
AIRPORT OPERATOR REPÜLŐTÉR ÜZEMELTETŐ
CONFIDENCE BIZALOM
PARADIGM SHIFT PARADIGMAVÁLTÁS
IMPERATIVE SZÜKSÉGSZERŰ
SOCIAL DISTANCING TÁRSADALMI TÁVOLSÁGTARTÁS
VIRUS TRANSMISSION VÍRUS ÁTADÁS
BAGGAGE SCREENING POGGYÁSZ ÁTVILÁGÍTÁS
BODY SCANNER TESTSZKENNER
CENTRALIZED IMAGE PROCESSING KÖZPONTOSÍTOTT KÉPFELDOLGOZÁS
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE MESTERSÉGES INTELLIGENCIA
TRAY TÁLCA
BOTTLENECK SZŰK KERESZTMETSZET
CONTAMINATED SZENNYEZETT
CONTAGIOUS RAGÁLYOS
CONVEYOR BELT FUTÓSZALAG
PET-DOWN SEARCH MOTOZÁS
CONCEALMENT REJTEGETÉS
CLUTTERED CONTENT ZSÚFOLT TARTALOM
DISPOSABLE RUBBER GLOVES ELDOBHATÓ GUMIKESZTYŰ
MITIGATE CSILLAPÍT
INTRIGUING FIGYELEMFELKELTŐ
IDENTITY VERIFICATION SZEMÉLYAZONOSSÁG IGAZOLÁS
HARNESS KIAKNÁZ
RISK ASSESSMENT KOCKÁZATÉRTÉKELÉS

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

PASSENGER GIVES FIRST CLASS SEAT TO OLD WOMAN

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

A Virgin Atlantic flight attendant named Leah Amy didn’t hesitate to play favourites when sharing the sweet story of her new favourite passengers. A kindhearted man and the older woman he selflessly swapped seats with, so she could enjoy his first-class indulgence.

Violet Allison was just getting settled into her economy seat on an overnight Virgin Atlantic flight from New York to London when another passenger walked up to her row and asked her a question she never, ever thought she’d hear. “Excuse me, would you like to fly first class?” said Jack Littlejohn, to which Allison replied in disbelief, “You’re joking.”

The stewardess who shared this heartwarming story has already met famous athletes, supermodels and actors through her work. Still, she said these two travellers were her new favourite passengers ever! It was reportedly the 88-year-old’s dream to sit at the front of the plane, Leah added, and the thoughtful traveller was inspired to make it come true out of the kindness of his own heart. You should have seen her face when I tucked her in her bed after supper – Leah remembers.

Littlejohn had been in New York with his mother and sister for a charity event dedicated to ending global homelessness. When Littlejohn and his family were leaving home to Scotland, his mom surprised the siblings with first-class seats. He said that even though the surprise was pleasant, it didn’t sit well with him because of the inequality between business and economy class. On the plane, economy passengers had to walk through the higher class to get to their seats in the lower portion of the aircraft. A comparison Littlejohn called unhealthy. After telling his mom of his intentions to give away his seat, Littlejohn went in search of a worthy passenger. When he saw the 88-year-old Allison, he instantly knew.

So Jack traded his upper-class cabin (Virgin’s equivalent of the traditional first-class section) for Violet’s economy seat situated next to the lavatory. Jack reportedly kept the good deed quiet and never made a peep or asked for anything the rest of the flight. No-fuss, no attention, literally did it out of the kindness of his own heart, no one asked him to.

The octogenarian has been a nurse in both the UK and over in America. She regularly travels to New York to see her daughter but hasn’t been able to for a while because of a knee replacement. Her dream has always been to sit at the front, and Jack made that come true. She said her daughter wouldn’t believe her, and wanted a selfie to prove it, as Leah details. Though she didn’t provide the stewardess with a phone number or email to share the photos taken of her on the particular flight, Leah said she planned to forward the memorable pictures in the mail and share them on social media in the meantime.

Allison says she was well taken care of for the night and credits the crew during the flight by welcoming and waving at her throughout. Before the plane landed, Littlejohn went up to check on Allison. That’s when Amy asked if she could take a snapshot with them. When the flight landed, Amy gathered the group together to take a picture of them all. After some chatting, they all said goodbye and went along their way.
The Washington Post

FLIGHT ATTENDANT LÉGIUTASKÍSÉRŐ
SELFLESSLY ÖNZETLENÜL
SWAP CSERÉL
INDULGENCE KÉNYEZTETÉS
ROW SOR
DISBELIEF HITETLENSÉG
TUCK IN BERAK
CHARITY EVENT JÓTÉKONYSÁGI RENDEZVÉNY
HOMELESSNESS HAJLÉKTALANSÁG
SIBLING TESTVÉR
INEQUALITY EGYENLŐTLENSÉG
INTENTION SZÁNDÉK
WORTHY MÉLTÓ
EQUIVALENT EGYENÉRTÉKŰ
LAVATORY MOSDÓ
DEED TETT
FUSS FONTOSKODÁS
OCTOGENARIAN NYOLCVANÉVES
KNEE REPLACEMENT TÉRDPÓTLÁS
PROVE BIZONYÍT
PROVIDE AD
WAVE INTEGET







Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

AIRCRAFT e-DELIVERY

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

Unprecedented times make aviation revise its processes and adapt to the new reality with safe yet effective solutions for everyone. One of the latest aviation ‘firsts’ has taken place in the aircraft handover area. Airbus has successfully launched aircraft hand-over and ‘e-delivery’ virtual process to both secure health of its customers and business continuity. The first airline that has recently received three brand new A320neo family aircraft this new way is Pegasus Airlines, a Turkish low-cost carrier.

Airbus, which plans to e-deliver more aircraft to more airlines in the upcoming days and weeks, reveals that this remote end-to-end approach consists of three phases:

  • Technical Acceptance Completion (TAC) tasks delegated to Airbus (or to a local third party appointed by the airline)
  • Electronic Transfer-of-Title (electronic ToT)
  • Ferry flight and subsequent reception of the aircraft at the customer’s base

Regarding the Technical Acceptance Completion part, this can be completed by Airbus on behalf of the operator accepting the plane. This stage includes the ground-check, the acceptance test flight, acceptance manuals and procedures, as well as minor cosmetic rework if needed.

Then the electronic Transfer-of-Title follows. Through the ‘e-SalesContracts’ platform each party, regardless their location can get together into one real-time virtual environment where they can optimise and simplify all the contractual transactions concluding these with the remote ToT digital signature. This way, Airbus eliminates the customer’s team’s necessity to be physically present at the Airbus Delivery Centre. 

Finally, the final phase comes – the ferry-flight – which can be performed by the customer’s flight crew (or an appointed third party) who can “pick-up the sanitised aircraft and fly it straight back from the delivery centre to the airline’s home base”.

Airbus said that this new delivery approach and all the digital aspects supporting the process “could become the blueprint for Airbus and its customers going forward”.
Aviation Voice

UNPRECEDENTED PÉLDÁTLAN
REVISE FELÜLVIZSGÁL
PROCESSES FOLYAMATOK
EFFECTIVE HATÉKONY
SOLUTION MEGOLDÁS
HANDOVER ÁTADÁS
LAUNCH ELINDÍT
DELIVERY LESZÁLLÍTÁS
CONTINUITY FOLYTONOSSÁG
BRAND NEW VADONATÚJ
LOW-COST CARRIER ALACSONY KÖLTSÉGŰ FUVAROZÓ
END-TO-END ELEJÉTŐL A VÉGÉIG
TECHNICAL ACCEPTANCE COMPLETION MŰSZAKI ÁTVÉTEL TELJESÍTÉS
APPOINTED KIJELÖLVE
TRANSFER-OF-TITLE JOGCÍM ÁTRUHÁZÁS
FERRY FLIGHT TECHNIKAI ÁTREPÜLÉS
SUBSEQUENT RÁKÖVETKEZŐ
RECEPTION ÁTVÉTEL
STAGE STÁDIUM
TEST FLIGHT BEREPÜLÉS
PLATFORM FELÜLET
REGARDLESS TEKINTET NÉLKÜL
ENVIRONMENT KÖRNYEZET
CONTRACTUAL SZERZŐDÉSES
CONCLUDING BEFEJEZVÉN
ELIMINATE KIZÁR
NECESSITY SZÜKSÉGESSÉG
SANITISE FERTŐTLENÍT
ASPECT VONATKOZÁS
BLUEPRINT TERVEZET

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

EASA CERTIFIES CARGO SEAT BAGS

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

Parts supplier Colibri Aero and design firm J&C Aero have developed a new way to transport cargo on narrowbody passenger planes. The cargo seat bag is designed to maximize available cargo space on passenger configured A320 family aircraft, while also keeping the goods safe and secure.

The coronavirus has accelerated the development of various advancements to help aviation better cope with the crisis and maintain vitally important supply lines worldwide. Thanks to rapid certification by EASA, airlines will start making use of the kit immediately.

Both companies, headquartered in Lithuania, began their work on this cabin modification last year. However, after the first signs of the emerging health crisis, already in January 2020, developers’ team increased their resources to come up with the solution sooner.

The outbreak of coronavirus worldwide has led to airlines slashing flight schedules and grounding thousands of aircraft, as travel demand bottoms out and nations close borders in an attempt to control the pandemic. With no other way to earn revenue, airlines are increasingly turning to operate cargo-only flights as a means to generate a little income. While passenger planes often carry a portion of cargo in the belly, merely filling the hold with load would not be enough to make these flights possible. As such, we’ve seen many airlines utilising the passenger cabin to maximise cargo capacity.

Considering the current situation, this modification for the Airbus A320 family planes has been approved by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). According to a statement, the cargo seat bag is a spacious 76x76x147 cm kit for a triple seat, with up to 75 kg of cargo stored on the seat and additional 9 kg – under the seat, totalling 252 kg per a triple seat block.

The companies also reveal that this modification could be promptly applied to passenger cabins, while the kit’s installation could be done in several minutes. In terms of cargo types, these bags allow effectively load passenger cabins with postal correspondence, household goods, electronics and other commercial cargo to medical equipment and different kinds of humanitarian supplies. The modification option came in the very right time. Now, a lot of passenger aircraft are recruited for cargo operations.

SUPPLIER BESZÁLLÍTÓ
NARROWBODY KESKENYTÖRZSŰ
CARGO SEAT BAG TEHER ÜLÉSZSÁK
COPE WITH MEGBIRKÓZIK VELE
EMERGE FELBUKKAN
OUTBREAK KITÖRÉS
SLASH MEGNYÍRBÁL
FLIGHT SCHEDULE MENETREND
GROUND FÖLDRE KÉNYSZERÍT
PANDEMIC JÁRVÁNY
REVENUE BEVÉTEL
TRIPLE SEAT BLOCK HÁRMAS ÜLÉSSOR
REVEAL KINYILATKOZTAT
EQUIPMENT BERENDEZÉS

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

WHY DO PILOT SEATS HAVE SHEEPSKIN COVERS?

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

Most of you have probably seen sheepskin seat covers in almost every cockpit you have ever been to. If you are still a newbie in the aviation world and haven’t tried any cockpit yet, you have undoubtedly seen those grey or white fluffy pilot seats in movies. However, the reason for covering pilot seats with sheepskin is more practical than it might seem. The primary function of genuine sheepskin cover is to keep pilots cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Whatever the cockpit’s temperature is, sheepskin covers remain of almost the same temperature and maintain a pilot dry.

Furthermore, they are hypoallergenic and won’t irritate sensitive skin or cause allergies. Sheepskin is a perfect seat cover for aircraft seats since it is totally flame resistant and self-extinguishing, as the aircraft certification procedures require. Sheepskin fire resistance comes from its naturally high nitrogen and water content. Because of this, it requires higher levels of oxygen in the surrounding environment to burn. Sheepskin covers do not meltdrip or stick to the skin when it burns. Last but not least advantage of sheepskin is that it tends to wear well and is long-lasting. Sheepskin resists liquids, rips and snags. Now you know what a treasure a sheepskin cover is!

Aviation Voice (Photo: Mike Trainer)

SHEEPSKIN BÁRÁNYBŐR
COCKPIT PILÓTAFÜLKE
FLUFFY BOLYHOS
PILOT SEAT PILÓTAÜLÉS
FLAME RESISTANT LÁNGÁLLÓ
SELF-EXTINGUISHING ÖNOLTÓ
FIRE RESISTANCE TŰZÁLLÓSÁG
MELT OLVAD
DRIP CSÖPÖG
STICK RAGAD
RIP HASADÁS
SNAG SZAKADÁS

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

FLYING RABBIT

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

Passengers on a flight headed to Japan were treated to the sight of an extraordinary fellow traveller in business class – Coco the adorable bunny, who was resplendent in her bow tie as she flew in style.

The eight-year-old rabbit accompanied her owner, Takako Ogawa, as she flew on an 11-hour flight United Airlines flight from San Francisco to move back home to Kyoto. While Coco had flown in the cargo hold on a flight from Japan to the US three years earlier, Takako feared that she was too old to do it again.

She registered Coco as an emotional support animal and paid $100 (€90.21) to allow the blue Mini Rex bunny to enter the cabin in a carry case. As it happened, the seat next to Takako was unoccupied, so Coco was permitted to occupy the seat. As she became a hit with staff, the bunny got to nibble on croissants, almonds and nuts on board the flight. Coco behaved very well, being calm but curious, and while she explored the pillows and around her own cubicle, Takako didn’t allow her to hop around the plane.

She also brought along plenty of pet sheets in Coco’s cart to take care of her bathroom needs. Takako, who is co-founder and CEO of analytics startup, Panalyt Japan, was afraid that Coco might become too stressed in the hold if other pets were barking or anxious beside her. She described the flight attendants as “super-nice” to allow the rabbit to occupy the seat beside her and bring her treats. The well-travelled Coco has also visited the Google office where Takako used to work and attended barbecues and appearing in family portraits. Due to her advancing age, Takako doesn’t plan to take her on any more flights, bringing the bunny’s short, but illustrious travels to a conclusion.
Lonely Planet

BUSINESS CLASS BUSINESS OSZTÁLY
ADORABLE IMÁDNIVALÓ
RESPLENDENT FÉNYLŐ
BOW TIE CSOKORNYAKKENDŐ
CARGO HOLD RAKTÉR
REGISTER REGISZTRÁL
EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMAL ÉRZELMI TÁMOGATÓ ÁLLAT
PERMIT MEGENGED
OCCUPY ELFOGLAL
NIBBLE RÁGCSÁL
BOARD FEDÉLZET
CUBICLE HÁLÓFÜLKE
FLIGHT ATTENDANT LÉGI UTASKÍSÉRŐ
ALLOW ENGEDÉLYEZ
TREAT CSEMEGE
ADVANCING AGE ELŐREHALADT KOR
CONCLUSION BEFEJEZÉS

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

ARE YOU SQUAWKING?

Nehézségi fok: NEHÉZ

“Piper G-BTKX squawk 3026”. In this case, squawk means turn your transponder on, not squawk like a bird. Squawk originates from “squawk your parrot”, which was used in WW2 by the British. In 1939 the first transponder was put into operation, and it was called the Parrot. The Parrot was a code name for Mark I, a British radio transponder system created to identify British aeroplanes.

It was a simple system that amplified the radar signals, causing the aircraft’s blip to extend on the operator’s radar display, identifying the aircraft as friendly. However, Mark I had the problem that the gain had to be adjusted in flight to keep it working, and in the field, it was correct only half the time. After a short run of the experimental prototype Mark I, the Mark II began widespread deployment in late 1940. It remained in use until 1943 when it began to be replaced by the standardised MARK III, which was used by all Allied aircraft until long after the war ended.

The IFF Mark II antenna on this Spitfire aircraft can just be made out, stretching across the rear fuselage from the roundel to the tip of the horizontal stabiliser (Wikipedia)

The need to identify their own was because when they were returning home from night missions at the end of WWII German aircraft would join into their formation. The parrot was a great solution, and the British became the first to develop Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). It would reply to a radar interrogating signal by responding with a coded transmission. A code would allow the land-based radar station to distinguish British from German aircraft on their radar screen. The transponder also contained an internal thermite bomb that would destroy the interior of the set when triggered by an inertial switch (in case of crash). This was supposed to prevent German discovery of the codes.

Nevertheless, there was a problem. The parrot was covering up radio operations. The intensive power of the transponder signal would often hide other targets as well. To control the operation of the airborne coded set to the best advantage, the ground-based radar station would give radio instructions regarding the operation of the airborne equipment. British pilots would only turn their parrot on when told by radio operations, “squawk your parrot”. Once identified, the operator would say “strangle your parrot”, meaning turn your transponder off.

Before the parrot, there was a way of detecting aircraft; however, it was a passive system that worked off metal by reflecting signals. This radar system was called primary radar, leading to the invention of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and the transponder later. The primary radar was for tackling the same task, such as showing where aircraft were located as the parrot did. However, it worked off of a radar signal bounced off the metal parts of the aircraft. This came with problems, such as most small aeroplanes at the time had only engines made of metal. Terrain and the environment got in the way of the radar range, and the system often detected unwanted objects like vehicles on the ground. When two aircraft got relatively close, there just seemed to be a big blur picked up by the radio operator. It was also quite sensitive to weather. This error in the primary radar leads to Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR) or Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) which depends on a transponder in the aircraft to respond to interrogated radar signals from ground stations.

A transponder system is also referred to as Identification Friend or Foe (IFF). The transponder is short for transmitter- responder and has not changed much about how it works since WWII.

The only vestige of this that remains today, other than the entire ATC system itself, is the term “squawk”, a directive for operation or code for the transponder. Old-time air traffic controllers may still have you strangle your parrot.

Not long after WWII an American transport aircraft was inbound to the UK. An RAF radar station asked the pilot if he had Parrot on board. There was a long pause and then came the reply ” No sir, but we have a bird colonel if he’s any use to you”.

SQUAWK RIKÁCSOL
TRANSPONDER VÁLASZJELADÓ
PARROT PAPAGÁJ
IDENTIFY AZONOSÍT
AMPLIFY FELERŐSÍT
FORMATION KÖTELÉK
INTERROGATING LEKÉRDEZŐ
RADAR SCREEN RADARKÉPERNYŐ
THERMITE BOMB TERMIT BOMBA
TRIGGER KIVÁLT
INERTIAL SWITCH TEHETETLENSÉGI KAPCSOLÓ
COVER UP BEFED
AIRBORNE EQUIPMENT FEDÉLZETI BERENDEZÉS
STRANGLE MEGFOJT
DETECT ÉSZLEL
REFLECT VISSZAVER
PRIMARY RADAR ELSŐDLEGES RADAR
TACKLE THE TASK MEGBIRKÓZIK A FELADATTAL
LOCATE FELDERÍT
BLUR ELMOSÓDOTTSÁG
SECONDARY SURVEILLANCE RADAR MÁSODLAGOS LÉGTÉRELLENŐRZŐ RADAR
FOE ELLENSÉG
VESTIGE MARADVÁNY
DIRECTIVE UTASÍTÁS
BIRD COLONEL EZREDES

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

AIRPLANE CLEANER BECOMES A PILOT

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

Muhammed’s salary was meagre, so nobody thought he would stay for long. He was earning only NGN 200 per day, which is approximately USD 0,5. However, Abubakar was persistent, and soon he was employed as ground staff by an airline in Maiduguri. He has worked in almost all the positions, and he proved himself to be a disciplined and efficient worker. He shares that working in this company helped him gain knowledge and experience in the aviation sector.

Next Muhammed had the chance to apply for a job as a crew member at Kabo Air, and after solid performance, he got the job.

He was working there for 8 years, for a monthly salary of NGN 17,000. After this, he moved on to Aero Contractors as a flight attendant. Soon his sharp mind and his previous experience paid off. The Deputy Managing Director noticed him. His salary was now NGN 170,000. He couldn’t believe it. In fact, when he received his first paycheck, he tried to return the money.

Instead of thoughtlessly spending his salary, Abubakar decided to save it. He went to the managing director and told him about his dream of becoming a pilot. The director loved the idea and supported Muhammed. Soon he was able to pay for his private pilot license in Canada. He successfully finished his training.

When Abubakar returned to Nigeria, he found out that he also needs a commercial pilot license, but this time he didn’t have enough money. This didn’t crush his enthusiasm. He asked the Deputy Managing Director for help, and because of his loyalty, the company assisted him. They sent him back to Canada for this license and sponsored his training.

After eight years of hard work in Aero Contractors, Muhammed Abubakar got a job as a first officer and finally promoted to captain at Azman Air.

His journey wasn’t easy, but his determination and his faith helped him become everything he’s ever dreamed of. Muhammed’s story is a pure example of how, when you work hard, and you never lose hope, you can achieve everything you want in life. After all, dreams don’t work unless you do.
iheartintelligence

MEAGRE CSEKÉLY
PERSISTENT KITARTÓ
GROUND STAFF FÖLDI SZEMÉLYZET
DISCIPLINED FEGYELMEZETT
CREW MEMBER SZEMÉLYZET TAGJA
FLIGHT ATTENDANT LÉGIUTASKÍSÉRŐ
EXPERIENCE TAPASZTALAT
PAYCHECK FIZETÉSI UTALVÁNY
THOUGHTLESSLY MEGGONDOLATLANUL
COMMERCIAL PILOT LICENSE KERESKEDELMI PILÓTA ENGEDÉLY
ENTHUSIASM LELKESEDÉS
LOYALTY HŰSÉG
FIRST OFFICER ELSŐTISZT
PROMOTE ELŐLÉPTET
CAPTAIN KAPITÁNY
DETERMINATION ELTÖKÉLTSÉG

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

BERLIN CANDY BOMBER

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

Has anyone heard of the Berlin Candy Bomber?

With the Nazi surrender in 1945, the Allies divided defeated Germany. The French, British, and Americans took the western half of the nation, while the Russians occupied Germany’s eastern half. Berlin itself was divided into sectors between the allies but was entirely surrounded by the Soviet-controlled sector of Germany. A little more than three years after World War II ended, Russian forces blockaded the Allied-controlled areas of Berlin on June 24, 1948, shutting off access to food, coal and medicine to two million German citizens. Berlin became the first front line of The Cold War, and the nine-month-old U.S. Air Force was charged with keeping Berliners alive while keeping the Cold War from turning hot.

The Berlin airlift began. The actual name was “Operation Vittles.”

One day in July of 1948 Halvorsen – an American commander pilot – saw a group of thirty children behind the barbed wire fence watching the comings and goings of the Allied transports, so he walked over to them. They told him the aircrews shouldn’t risk their lives when the weather was bad – they could get by on less until the weather cleared. “Just don’t give up on us” was all they asked. He talked with them as they asked many questions in their broken English and before he knew it, an hour had passed, and he had to leave. As he walked away, he stopped and looked back at them. It had occurred to him that in all that time, they hadn’t once asked for any candy. They had in fact listened attentively and respectfully, expressing gratitude for the flour and food the Americans, British and French were flying in at great risk to themselves. They were unlike any of the boisterous crowds of kids the Americans were used to who tugged at their sleeves and clamoured for chocolate.

He dug in his pockets, but could only find two sticks of Wrigley’s gum which he tore in half. He walked back and passed the four pieces through the fence. The lucky kids carefully unwrapped their prizes and handed the wrappers to the others who gratefully sniffed the foil. There was no pushing or grabbing. It had a profound impact on Halvorsen.

He promised he would drop enough gum for everyone the next day. When they asked how they would know it was him, he said he would wiggle his wings. “Was ist wiggle?” they asked, and he explained.

That night, he put together three bags of candy bars and gum using his candy ration and his co-pilot and engineer rations. He was surprised by how heavy they were. Dropping them at a hundred miles an hour on the children would not have the desired effect, so he fashioned parachutes out of handkerchiefs.

As he flew into the airport the next day, he saw the kids standing behind the wire, attentively watching the planes come in. He wiggled his wings and immediately, the small crowd of children threw up their arms and jumped up and down. The bundles of candy were shoved out the flare chute behind the pilot seat, and Halvorsen hoped they reached their target. The plane landed, unloaded its cargo, and was ready to take off again thirty minutes later. As he taxied down the runway, he finally saw the children waving their arms, their mouths open with unheard cries of joy. Three of them waved three parachutes.

Halvorsen and his crew repeated this once a week for the next three weeks, parachuting three bags each time. One day, while his plane was being unloaded, he entered the base operations office and found the planning table loaded with letters, returned parachutes and artwork addressed to Onkel Wackelflugel (“Uncle Wiggly Wings”). He knew he was in a world of trouble. They stopped the drops for two weeks, but the crowd of kids kept growing, so they decided to do one more drop of six bundles, and that was it.

Except it wasn’t. His colonel showed him a big newspaper article with a picture clearly showing his plane’s tail number and demanded to know what was going on. Halvorsen told him and awaited his fate, which clearly could include a court-martial. When General Tunner, who was in charge of the Berlin Airlift now nicknamed Operation Vittles, heard the story, he recognized the propaganda potential and simply said: “Keep it up”. Operation Little Vittles was born.

Halvorsen’s nickname resulted from the fact that he would rock the plane to let the children know which plane would be dropping candy.
Hubpages

CANDY BOMBER CUKOR BOMBÁZÓ
SURRENDER MEGADÁS
DEFEATED LEGYŐZÖTT
SURROUNDED KÖRÜLVETT
AIR FORCE LÉGIERŐ
AIRLIFT LÉGIHÍD
COMMANDER PILOT PARANCSNOK PILÓTA
BARBED WIRE FENCE SZÖGESDRÓT KERÍTÉS
ATTENTIVELY FIGYELMESEN
RESPECTFULLY TISZTELETTELJESEN
BOISTEROUS FÉKTELEN
CLAMOUR LÁRMÁZIK
PROFOUND IMPACT MÉLY HATÁS
WIGGLE HIS WINGS BILLEGTETI A SZÁRNYÁT
FASHIONED PARACHUTES EJTŐERNYŐKET KÉSZÍTETT
FLARE CHUTE JELZŐFÁKLYA KIDOBÓNYÍLÁS
TAXIED GURULT
BUNDLE CSOMAG
COLONEL EZREDES
TAIL NUMBER FAROKSZÁM
FATE SORS
COURT-MARTIAL HADBÍRÓSÁG