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HIRDETMÉNYEK

A REPÜLÉS ÉS A BIZTONSÁG ANYANYELVE

A Hungarocontrol blogbejegyzése az angol repülési szaknyelv, a rádiótávbeszélő kifejezések fontosságáról, magyarul.

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

BERLIN CANDY BOMBER

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

Has anyone heard of the Berlin Candy Bomber?

With the Nazi surrender in 1945, the Allies divided defeated Germany. The French, British, and Americans took the western half of the nation, while the Russians occupied Germany’s eastern half. Berlin itself was divided into sectors between the allies but was entirely surrounded by the Soviet-controlled sector of Germany. A little more than three years after World War II ended, Russian forces blockaded the Allied-controlled areas of Berlin on June 24, 1948, shutting off access to food, coal and medicine to two million German citizens. Berlin became the first front line of The Cold War, and the nine-month-old U.S. Air Force was charged with keeping Berliners alive while keeping the Cold War from turning hot.

The Berlin airlift began. The actual name was “Operation Vittles.”

One day in July of 1948 Halvorsen – an American commander pilot – saw a group of thirty children behind the barbed wire fence watching the comings and goings of the Allied transports, so he walked over to them. They told him the aircrews shouldn’t risk their lives when the weather was bad – they could get by on less until the weather cleared. “Just don’t give up on us” was all they asked. He talked with them as they asked many questions in their broken English and before he knew it, an hour had passed, and he had to leave. As he walked away, he stopped and looked back at them. It had occurred to him that in all that time, they hadn’t once asked for any candy. They had in fact listened attentively and respectfully, expressing gratitude for the flour and food the Americans, British and French were flying in at great risk to themselves. They were unlike any of the boisterous crowds of kids the Americans were used to who tugged at their sleeves and clamoured for chocolate.

He dug in his pockets, but could only find two sticks of Wrigley’s gum which he tore in half. He walked back and passed the four pieces through the fence. The lucky kids carefully unwrapped their prizes and handed the wrappers to the others who gratefully sniffed the foil. There was no pushing or grabbing. It had a profound impact on Halvorsen.

He promised he would drop enough gum for everyone the next day. When they asked how they would know it was him, he said he would wiggle his wings. “Was ist wiggle?” they asked, and he explained.

That night, he put together three bags of candy bars and gum using his candy ration and his co-pilot and engineer rations. He was surprised by how heavy they were. Dropping them at a hundred miles an hour on the children would not have the desired effect, so he fashioned parachutes out of handkerchiefs.

As he flew into the airport the next day, he saw the kids standing behind the wire, attentively watching the planes come in. He wiggled his wings and immediately, the small crowd of children threw up their arms and jumped up and down. The bundles of candy were shoved out the flare chute behind the pilot seat, and Halvorsen hoped they reached their target. The plane landed, unloaded its cargo, and was ready to take off again thirty minutes later. As he taxied down the runway, he finally saw the children waving their arms, their mouths open with unheard cries of joy. Three of them waved three parachutes.

Halvorsen and his crew repeated this once a week for the next three weeks, parachuting three bags each time. One day, while his plane was being unloaded, he entered the base operations office and found the planning table loaded with letters, returned parachutes and artwork addressed to Onkel Wackelflugel (“Uncle Wiggly Wings”). He knew he was in a world of trouble. They stopped the drops for two weeks, but the crowd of kids kept growing, so they decided to do one more drop of six bundles, and that was it.

Except it wasn’t. His colonel showed him a big newspaper article with a picture clearly showing his plane’s tail number and demanded to know what was going on. Halvorsen told him and awaited his fate, which clearly could include a court-martial. When General Tunner, who was in charge of the Berlin Airlift now nicknamed Operation Vittles, heard the story, he recognized the propaganda potential and simply said: “Keep it up”. Operation Little Vittles was born.

Halvorsen’s nickname resulted from the fact that he would rock the plane to let the children know which plane would be dropping candy.
Hubpages

CANDY BOMBER CUKOR BOMBÁZÓ
SURRENDER MEGADÁS
DEFEATED LEGYŐZÖTT
SURROUNDED KÖRÜLVETT
AIR FORCE LÉGIERŐ
AIRLIFT LÉGIHÍD
COMMANDER PILOT PARANCSNOK PILÓTA
BARBED WIRE FENCE SZÖGESDRÓT KERÍTÉS
ATTENTIVELY FIGYELMESEN
RESPECTFULLY TISZTELETTELJESEN
BOISTEROUS FÉKTELEN
CLAMOUR LÁRMÁZIK
PROFOUND IMPACT MÉLY HATÁS
WIGGLE HIS WINGS BILLEGTETI A SZÁRNYÁT
FASHIONED PARACHUTES EJTŐERNYŐKET KÉSZÍTETT
FLARE CHUTE JELZŐFÁKLYA KIDOBÓNYÍLÁS
TAXIED GURULT
BUNDLE CSOMAG
COLONEL EZREDES
TAIL NUMBER FAROKSZÁM
FATE SORS
COURT-MARTIAL HADBÍRÓSÁG

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

PEOPLE ARE BURIED ON RUNWAY

Nehézségi fok: KÖZEPES

While runway 10 at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport in Georgia may not be a particularly difficult or scary landing, it does involve touching down on a pair of graves.

Like many airports, Savannah/Hilton Head was built on former farmland. Farmland often comes with ancient burial sites and family plots, and most airports deal with it by moving any graves they find to nearby cemeteries. But when the Savannah airport needed to expand during World War II, it was met with resistance from the Dotson family’s descendants.

A family plot that was part of the land in the expansion was estimated to have had about 100 graves, including those of slaves, and all but four were moved to a cemetery.

Believing that their ancestors wouldn’t have wanted to abandon the land they worked so hard to cultivate, the Dotson family insisted on keeping the matriarch and patriarch put. The graves of Richard and Catherine Dotson, the farmers who originally owned the land and died in 1884 and 1877, sit on the edge of runway 10 and 28, while two more graves, of their relatives Daniel Hueston and John Dotson, can be found nearby in the brush.

Richard and Catherine’s graves feature markers — his says “At rest” while hers says “Gone home to rest”.

The airport says these graves are the only ones in the world embedded in an active 9,350-foot runway. And, of course, they’re not without their spooky stories. It’s said that if you are coming into land just after sundown, two figures will appear just along the north side of the runway. Family members are allowed to visit, though they are not permitted to leave flowers. It is, after all, an active runway.
Insider

RUNWAY FUTÓPÁLYA
GRAVE SÍRHELY
EXPAND TERJESZKEDIK
DESCENDANT LESZÁRMAZOTT
ESTIMATED BECSÜLT
ANCESTORS ELŐDÖK
ABANDON ELHAGY
CULTIVATE MEGMŰVEL
EDGE SZÉLE
EMBEDDED BEÁGYAZOTT

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL IN EARLY DAYS

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

From the late 1920s, this photo shows a typical air traffic controller from the era with simple communication tools. He had only two flags. The checkered flag was used to clear aeroplanes for take-off and landing, while the red flag meant ‘hold your position‘.

Photo: Archie W. League by National Archives (faa.gov)

Above is Archie W. League, usually regarded as the first air traffic controller. The 1929 photo shows him dressed for cold weather at St. Louis, where the airport operator employed him to prevent collisions between aircraft.

Photo: Archie W. League by National Archives (faa.gov)

League is shown on duty in his summer office. Note the rolled-up flags in the wheelbarrow and the dangling lunch box. His other equipment included a folding chair, drinking water, and a pad for taking notes. League joined the Federal service in 1937. He eventually became FAA‘s Air Traffic Service director and retired as an Assistant Administrator in 1973. The profession that League pioneered soon gained a measure of sophistication.

Photo: Bill Darby by National Archives (faa.gov)

In 1930, Cleveland Municipal Airport established a radio-equipped airport control tower. In the next five years, about twenty cities followed Cleveland’s lead. Controller Bill Darby is shown with the latest equipment in this 1936 view of Newark tower.
NATCA (faa.gov)

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER LÉGIFORGALMI IRÁNYÍTÓ
CHECKERED FLAG KOCKÁS ZÁSZLÓ
CLEAR ENGEDÉLYEZ
AEROPLANE REPÜLŐGÉP
TAKE-OFF FELSZÁLLÁS
LANDING LESZÁLLÁS
HOLD YOUR POSITION VÁRAKOZZON A HELYÉN
AIRPORT OPERATOR REPÜLŐTÉR ÜZEMELTETŐ
PREVENT COLLISIONS MEGAKADÁLYOZ ÖSSZEÜTKÖZÉST
AIRCRAFT LÉGIJÁRMŰ
ON DUTY SZOLGÁLATBAN
WHEELBARROW TALICSKA
EQUIPMENT BERENDEZÉS
EVENTUALLY VÉGÜL IS
CONTROL TOWER IRÁNYÍTÓTORONY

Kategóriák
ÉRDEKESSÉGEK

AIRBUS TO PUT BEDS IN PLANE’S CARGO HOLD

Nehézségi fok: KÖNNYŰ

European plane-maker Airbus has announced it is to develop sleeping pods, lounges, and meeting rooms inside the cargo hold. They are working with Zodiac Aerospace to develop sleeping berths that can be swapped out with regular cargo containers on specific flights. The option of adding sleeping pods, lounges, and meeting rooms inside the cargo hold will be offered in A330 wide-body jets from 2020.

Sleeping pods (Source: Airbus)

Airbus said the aircraft’s cargo floor loading system would not be affected as the passenger module will be designed to sit directly on top of it.

“This approach to commercial air travel is a step change towards passenger comfort,” said Geoff Pinner, the head of Airbus’s cabin and cargo program. “We have already received very positive feedback from several airlines on our first mock-ups.”

Airbus A330 lower cargo floor (Source: Telair)

Ultimately, it will be up to airlines to decide how much they will charge for using the cargo hold. However, Zodiac says it sees the space as an add-on to a passenger’s ticket.
Secret Flying

ANNOUNCE BEJELENT
PLANE MAKER REPÜLŐGÉP GYÁRTÓ
SLEEPING POD ALVÓ FÜLKE
LOUNGE TÁRSALGÓ
GARGO HOLD RAKTÉR
BERTH FEKHELY
SWAP OUT KICSERÉL
CONTAINER KONTÉNER
WIDE BODY SZÉLESTÖRZSŰ
CARGO FLOOR RAKTÉR PADLÓ
LOADING SYSTEM RAKODÁSI RENDSZER
MOCK-UP MINTAPÉLDÁNY
ULTIMATELY VÉGÜL

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HIRDETMÉNYEK

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